Gun Culture in America is different than Europe

Amalie Davidsen
Opinion Writer
adavidse@unca.edu

I never thought I would shoot a gun in my life.

During a random morning two years ago, I was trying to make room for the food I knew I was about to conquer — a task that seemed impossible.

I was running on a treadmill in my friend’s backyard. It was still dark outside, but the birds were singing just enough for me to be motivated to take a few more strides. My stomach felt bloated, and for each step I took I could feel last night’s food partying in my stomach.

That night I gathered with the American family to celebrate the good times America brings.

After the meal and a couple of drinks the atmosphere was great; laughter and joy were filling up the room, illuminated by candles and discreet light.

During dessert, the joy and laughter eased out, the television was on, the guests with small children had left and the wine bottles were empty.

People were happy.

Suddenly, I was standing in the middle of a tiny room located just beside the kitchen. It was dark and cold. The lights were turned on and I saw myself in the surrounded by numerous guns; pistols and rifles of all sizes were placed precisely on shelves and some were locked in a glass cabinet.

I honestly got scared, and all I wanted was to run home. The father must have noticed my nervousness, tapped me on my shoulder and handed me an empty pistol, which in my hand looked more dangerous than on the shelf. I looked at him and forced a giggly smile while I handed him back the gun.

In America, to me it seems like everybody has a gun for protection or for hunting. The American people take huge pride in their gun laws and their guns. For instance, I have a teammate and a close friend who used to drive with a pistol in her car when going to practice two hours away from her house through a sketchy area.

Before coming to America I had never seen, held or thought about guns — but my first year in Asheville would change that.

I clearly remember on a hot summer day freshman year when I went to Brevard with my tennis team to spend the day and night in my friend’s cabin. Her father had promised us to show his guns and let us shoot them.

I honestly did not believe her when she told me, but I was soon very surprised. After going through all the security and safety parts of shooting a gun, he pulled out a shotgun, a rifle and a small pistol for us to either look at or shoot with.

Suddenly, I was standing with ear blockers on, aiming toward an empty beer can with the shotgun resting on my shoulder. Honestly, I thought I was about to piss my pants, I was so nervous.  I pulled the trigger and fell a couple of steps behind, and actually hit the can.

In Denmark, only people with hunting certificates can buy a rifle strictly for hunting purposes only. There is extreme control, and no one can go into a pawn shop and buy a gun. It has to go carefully through the system.

When I tell my friends overseas I shot a shotgun in my friend’s backyard, or that some Americans own AK-47s, they will not believe me until I show them pictures of me holding tight onto a gun.

I clearly remember my first time in Wal-Mart. Besides all the chaos, something that blew my mind was that a person with a government-issued ID could buy a gun.

The guns were locked in glass cabinets. Some were pink, some were green and covered in a camouflage pattern, but they were all potentially deadly weapons, which could be bought in a retail store.  It was like the guns were commercialized and aimed toward people’s personalities. They were made to look cute, which is disturbing. It is a gun, not a toy.

In Denmark, we have a strict knife law restricting the use of knives. It is illegal to carry knives in public places, and in order to have a knife blade exceed 12 centimeters, you must have permission from the police.

There is no chance you will find a pink or a camouflage colored gun in the local supermarket, and it is not possible to buy knives at the gas station.  

These Danish laws are held in order to decrease violence, crime, killings and other incidents involving deadly weapons.

I am aware of the differences of society structure, government control and mentalities of Denmark and America, but I do believe guns and other deadly weapons are too easy to access in the states.

Honestly, I believe American gun laws are extremely casual. I understand the American pride regarding guns, but I do not think anybody should be proud of the innocent people get killed every year in America, either because of street or gang violence or police violence, and I believe this is due to the mentality concerning guns.

It saddens me innocent people get shot by police or innocent kids get caught in the middle of a drug war and lose their lives.

This problem cannot be solved by increasing the causality of weapons. It is about time the American gun industry is called out as well as its money and power is decreased.   

33 thoughts on “Gun Culture in America is different than Europe

  • April 26, 2017 at 6:21 pm
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    The right to own and use firearms is baked into the foundation documents of the USA (i.e. the Constitution and the dialogues that led to its creation.) Deaths of truly innocent people in crime here are relatively rare. In most of the USA rates of violent crimes are on a par with similar Western democracies, such as England and Wales or Australia; most crime is concentrated in certain parts of a few major cities such as Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, and (embarrassingly to me) Washington, DC. And by the way, about 2/3 of shooting deaths in the USA are suicides, which occur independently of the availability of one mechanism or another (just look at Japan where gun ownership is almost unheard of.)

    The problem really isn’t guns, which have been available throughout the centuries as crime rates have gone through up and down cycles. The problem has to do with people – Unemployment, lack of education, poor availability of mental health care, and perhaps most importantly a breakdown of the traditional family structure that provides children with positive male and female role models. To be blunt, too many boys and girls are being raised in the absence of decent men who take responsibility for and mentor their children.

    Reply
  • April 27, 2017 at 2:39 am
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    Leftists must HANG.

    Reply
    • April 27, 2017 at 2:38 pm
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      what do you mean?

      Reply
    • April 29, 2017 at 12:19 pm
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      That’s not helpful, you daft fuckwaffle.

      Reply
  • April 27, 2017 at 3:52 pm
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    Running away from guns just means the author Amalie was unfamiliar with tools that are as natural, common, well liked, and admired in millions of American homes. These people cannot relate to Amalie’s experience and feelings at all. It is like she is from strange planet where nothing seems normal or right.

    Reply
  • April 27, 2017 at 5:54 pm
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    I’ve been browsing online greater than three hours lately, yet I by no means discovered any fascinating article like yours. It is beautiful worth sufficient for me. In my view, if all web owners and bloggers made excellent content material as you did, the internet might be much more useful than ever before.|

    Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 12:47 am
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    I am a red-blooded American gun owner. We are not subjects like you European crown kissers. We are not the descendents of a gene pool of subservient serfs. Our ancestors took risks. Massive risks.

    From my cold dead hands , girlfriend.

    Liberty or Death.

    Reply
    • April 29, 2017 at 9:52 am
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      Other than the shock of unfamiliarity Miss. Davidsen appears to have had a very positive experience with firearms. From her article it seems that safety and care were exercised by those that introduced her to firearms.

      I must however take her to task for the following comments:

      ” I understand the American pride regarding guns, but I do not think anybody should be proud of the innocent people get killed every year in America, either because of street or gang violence or police violence, and I believe this is due to the mentality concerning guns.”

      Americans are not “proud” of innocent people being killed.

      Using terms such as “street or gang violence or police violence” when you have no knowledge of the subjects to equate these terms to mentality reveals a clear niativity of violence or crime.

      “These Danish laws are held in order to decrease violence, crime, killings and other incidents involving deadly weapons.”

      Not too long ago the Danes had laws and policies for such things, it was called
      samarbejdspolitikken” (cooperation) and it functioned very well for themselves and the Nazis. Americans have historically had a different take on occupation and tyranny that’s why we had a revolution and civilian firearms ownership.

      It appears from reading between the lines that Miss. Davidson has enjoyed a rather safe and privileged life so far; travel, playing tennis, no real responsibilities. Perhaps a sebatical from academia in the real world of Detroit, Cleveland or St. Louis could expand her understanding of Americans and their interest in firearms for protection?

      Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 9:35 am
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    To react with fear to dangerous weapons is understandable. This is particularly true when someone is as unfamiliar with weapons as Amalie is. There is a tremendously awesome responsibility that goes along with owning and carrying deadly weapons. I think Amalie may have a valid point when she says that Americans have a casual relationship with firearms. I say this after spending 12 years in the Army and the past 9 having a carry-and-conceal permit.

    Where I disagree with Amalie is that we need stricter gun laws. What I think we DO need, is a total overhaul of the patchwork of federal, state and local laws. I think there should be federal preemption; I also think that carry permits should be recognized cross country the same way that drivers licenses should be. Americans have a much more casual, and deadly, relationship with the 1000 – 6000lb missiles that they climb into every day.

    I think that more information on how, when, and why firearms are employed is necessary. Between the FBI Uniformed Crime Report and the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, the overwhelming majority of firearms deaths are by suicide. Setting that aside, I think that we should look at violence as a more encompassing phenomenon versus “gun violence.” Both sides of the firearms argument have an unhealthy fear of data. If we can understand how firearms are used, and how they are not used, we can begin to solve our society’s issues of violence. Unfortunately, the two sides of the ideology are too emotionally entrenched in their views and have far too much invested in the ideological war to make an honest effort to actually come to a viable resolution.

    Amalie’s post, I think, is a great example of people without a vested interest in the topic attempting to show The One TRUE Way™ and t hat all other frames of mind are invalid. I think that is a disservice to the American citizens that work diligently to own and operate firearms in a safe and legal manner.

    Thank you for reading my thoughts to their conclusion; have a great day.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 9:37 am
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    If you can’t handle having freedom, stay off the continent.

    Reply
  • Pingback: Quote of the Day: A European Discovers America’s Gun Culture…And is Horrified | Firearms Life

  • April 29, 2017 at 10:00 am
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    As an immigrant i appreciate that America is only place a dictatorship can never take root due to its people being armed. I fully support the universal right of all civilians to be armed. Europe is a mirage of freedom but in reality is a society controlled by Banks.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 10:12 am
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    This is a very very strange opinion piece. Denmark also has less protections than US First, Fourth and Fifth amendment rights. I went to undergrad for one year there. You have to show your ID to police if you are walking on the street even if there is not reasonable suspicion or probable cause. Refusal to do so constitutes reasonable suspicion for a search. Also if a warrant is executed in your home, items not on the warrant are admissible, something forbidden in the US due to the Bill of Rights.
    As a woman I was conscious of the really extremely high rate of rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment in Denmark, which has been doubling every few years.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/sweden-and-denmark-have-highest-number-of-sexual-assaults-in-europe-a6800901.html
    https://www.thelocal.dk/20170201/reported-rapes-in-denmark-double-in-two-years

    I also found these quotes interesting:
    “and it is not possible [in Denmark]to buy knives at the gas station.  ”
    But you can in Norway, which has a lower murder rate. hmmm.

    “or that some Americans own AK-47s”
    Fact: total US murders with legally owned full automatic weopons such as AK-47 in the US since 1950 (when records started for that): 2. Not two per year, two in the last 67 years. People killed with toothbrushes since then: about 240.

    “I clearly remember my first time in Wal-Mart. Besides all the chaos, something that blew my mind was that a person with a government-issued ID could buy a gun. ”
    Fact: Walmart stores that sell guns are all Federally licensed dealers, and do not sell any guns without a full FBI background check to make sure the person is completely qualified by law to buy the gun. And what is the writer suggesting, a person who wants a shotgun buy it online? by wholesale?

    “This problem cannot be solved by increasing the causality of weapons. It is about time the American gun industry is called out as well as its money and power is decreased.   ”
    a) The number and power of firearms has both increased profoundly since the mid 1990’s. US murder rate fell 61% as guns increased and gun control was reduced.
    b) A dozen studies by police and criminal justice agencies across the US have shown over 90% of homicide victims are criminals. If you are not a criminal you are safer from rape, safer from violent assault and safer from murder in the US than you are in Denmark. (the huge majority of US murder is criminal on criminal)
    c) between 500,000 to three million crimes are prevented each year by gun owners. Gun murder of non criminals in the US is under 800 per year.
    d) the NRA has the largest membership of any civil rights organization of the US. It has 56% approval from all US citizens according to gallup. Paid membership of all US gun control groups combined is under 400 persons. it is the gun control groups that are a fake non citizen lobby. NRA paid membership is over 5 million and growing as the gun control advocates attempt to ban guns and advocate confiscation.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 10:38 am
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    Remember , there is a reason many people left the old coutry, and came to America all those centuries ago. In a word, freedom. The Brits and Europeans have never been free, either subjects of the Crown, or their governments,which they still are. Yet, it seems every time there is a conflict, it is the US that saves them. Perhaps we should stop that. Perhaps we should end NATO, then see how well they fair when the Russians or Islam march across Europe.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:10 am
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    I think your understanding of the US was closest when you touched upon “…differences of society structure, government control and mentalities…”, for many Americans, guns are a physical manifestation of freedom. You look that at them and based on your culture, see them as a device of violence and killing, a reason for crime; many of us in the US own a firearm as a means of safety for ourselves and our family, a tool to dissuade crime – in many cases without having to actually fire it. America is based on the ideal of life, liberty and the persuit of happiness; a firearm, the right to free expression, essentially without exception, and voting are some of the defenses we have to ensure the country, and at an individual level, the ideal is maintained. Have a wonderful time getting to know this great country.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:13 am
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    Amalie –

    First, to be clear, there are MANY federal and state restrictions in the US related to the legal purchase of a firearm. To suggest one can just saunter into a gun store with a driver’s license or state ID and purchase a firearm is rather disingenuous. I do get where it might appear that way to an outsider but it simply isn’t true. Unfortunately many of our own citizens are equally in the dark on this issue.

    There IS a definite line between “illegal” and “still possible”, though – that may come as a shock to some, but making something illegal does not really have any effect on whether or not it is ultimately still possible. The government by itself simply cannot legislate reality. Laws are, ultimately, a kind of “friendly agreement” between the citizen and the state. There is MUCH room on either side of the relationship to ignore or abuse that agreement 😉

    Culture also factors in when talking about firearms in the US but I would caution against drawing too direct of a conclusion there. Yes, the Second Amendment in our Bill of Rights acknowledges one’s inherent right to self-protection – this is often framed as a gun issue but it is really a “most effective tool for the job” issue. Limiting the right of potential victims to protect themselves is hardly a winning strategy when criminal simply do not care in the slightest what laws they break, either in the commision of their crime or in the preparation for it (i.e. how they obtain their tools…)

    I get it, though. Coming from another country/culture there certainly is a need for adjustment. I’m sure I would have a similar struggle visiting Denmark if it meant having to give up my ability to protect myself from terrorists or (the more pedestrian) local thugs targeting tourists!

    I would like to think that most of us Americans simply do not try an sugar coat a difficult subject. Let us start here: a tool does not have any will of its own. Guns are a tool – a tool with a very specific use, mind you, but a tool nonetheless. Is the gun debate really about how people choose to use that tool or is it over whether or not the tool is valid/useful? You cannot expect to legislate a physical tool into oblivion – has that ever worked? No.

    In the end the gun debate is actually about a core issue: control. Does government have a right to control the citizen? Does that extend to the invalidation of basic human rights? I say no. Absolutely no. Laws and the governmental protection they afford should never be perverted to point where a law-abiding citizen’s rights are invalidated by the government’s response to the actions of criminals. Laws establish a guideline for proper behavior and, by extension, punish criminals – they should NOT punish the law-abiding!

    Taking away a person’s right to self defense is NOT the solution. Better protection against and prosecution of criminals IS. This plays out on a regular basis here where the US cities with the most restrictive gun laws – unconstitutional gun laws that strip potential victims of the ability to effectively protect themselves – prove to be the most dangerous cities in the country with the highest rates of violent crime. Is that all gun crime? No. Is that the true concern? Of course not! Violence is violence.

    Like it or not, guns ARE an effective tool, regardless of who wields them. Senseless European-style anti-gun laws don’t change that basic fact. Better to have effective tools in the hands of those who can do the most good with them, I say. Our government, for the most part, acknowledges a citizen’s right to protect innocent life, whether it is their own, that of a member of their family or the public at large.

    Cheers,
    Tim

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:22 am
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    I think much of European’s shock about American gun rights is based on envy.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:52 am
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    People were happy.

    Suddenly, I was standing in the middle of a tiny room located just beside the kitchen. It was dark and cold. The lights were turned on and I saw myself in the surrounded by numerous guns; pistols and rifles of all sizes were placed precisely on shelves and some were locked in a glass cabinet.

    I honestly got scared, and all I wanted was to run home. The father must have noticed my nervousness, tapped me on my shoulder and handed me an empty pistol, which in my hand looked more dangerous than on the shelf. I looked at him and forced a giggly smile while I handed him back the gun.

    This is because the vast majority of families have a positive connotation with firearms. You see on the news people being killed with guns and you have developed this hoplophobia against it. 99.999999% or more of Americans aren’t killing people with their firearms and they are enjoyable to them. They don’t associate their firearms with death and destruction. You do. As an example I have a beautiful swiss made k11 carbine straight pull made in 1916. All I get out of it is warm feelings. I also have a an AK variant that my father gave to me before he passed away. I remember buying it with him at the gun show when I was a kid, I remember shooting it with him for the first time. It was fun and we had a great time. Nothing horrifying about it.

    In America, to me it seems like everybody has a gun for protection or for hunting.

    Or for sport, enjoyment in shooting, and many others.

    The American people take huge pride in their gun laws and their guns.

    I take pride in our “lack” of gun laws. Which isn’t much pride at all, given how many laws we have. I wish there were fewer laws – not more.

    In Denmark, only people with hunting certificates can buy a rifle strictly for hunting purposes only. There is extreme control, and no one can go into a pawn shop and buy a gun. It has to go carefully through the system.

    We are not “pro control” here. We like freedom, self reliance, independence, personal responsibility, etc.

    These Danish laws are held in order to decrease violence, crime, killings and other incidents involving deadly weapons.

    It is against the law here to murder people. If someone is being murdered, why does it matter what instrument was employed to murder them?? Also, in another few decades, this silly anti-freedom law that makes attempts to force-fed people safety and authoritarian control, will be completely moot, when anybody and everybody will be able to print a gun made of steel by means of laser sintering. 3D plastic printers were unobtainable by the vast majority of the public due to its cost, and now anyone can have one, even build them themselves, at almost no expense at all. Laser sintering is next.

    In Denmark, we have a strict knife law restricting the use of knives. It is illegal to carry knives in public places, and in order to have a knife blade exceed 12 centimeters, you must have permission from the police.

    I’m sure the criminals completely and voluntarily follow this.

    I am aware of the differences of society structure, government control and mentalities of Denmark and America, but I do believe guns and other deadly weapons are too easy to access in the states.

    That’s fine. It is clear you don’t support the US constitution (2nd amendment of constitution –
    Question 45 of the Application of Naturalization – USCIS form N400). When you are finished up here, please make no attempts to become a US citizen and move back to Denmark. Denmark is the place for you.

    Honestly, I believe American gun laws are extremely casual. I understand the American pride regarding guns, but I do not think anybody should be proud of the innocent people get killed every year in America, either because of street or gang violence or police violence, and I believe this is due to the mentality concerning guns.

    Mentality concerning guns, or mentality concerning murder? Again, 99.99999% or more of Americans like the guns and don’t want to kill anyone. Is the problem the gun, or the individuals decision to commit murder? Do you seriously think for one second that the street and gang criminals are getting their guns legally? The problem here isn’t a gun problem. It’s a criminal problem. People willing to kill other people. They are the problem. Not people that own guns.

    It saddens me innocent people get shot by police or innocent kids get caught in the middle of a drug war and lose their lives.

    It saddens me that people don’t take responsibility for their children and just hand them over to the village to be raised by the riffraff. Again, is the problem that guns exist in this environment? Or is the problem that people were raised without morals and civility?

    This problem cannot be solved by increasing the causality of weapons.

    I disagree with your premise that the “problem” is guns. The problem is morally reprehensible individuals. When they murder someone, I am upset about the death that has resulted. I could care less what instrument they used to murder someone. The problem is they murdered someone. The problem isn’t, that they owned a gun, or a knife, or a bat, or whatever.

    It is about time the American gun industry is called out as well as its money and power is decreased.

    Uhhh. No. The “American Gun Industry” isn’t the cause of crime and gang violence. The “American Gun Industry” isn’t a single entity appropriated by taxes. It is many thousands of large and small companies privately owned and operated by people with the freedom to do so. I know you don’t like this kind of freedom, which is why Denmark is the place for you.

    Everything about your post is offensive by the way. If you don’t like our culture, you don’t have to stay here. Your opinion is noted, and we don’t really care for it. I wouldn’t go to Denmark and tell them that I didn’t like their culture and that they should change it because I didn’t like it. But yet this is what you are doing to us.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:53 am
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    People were happy.

    Suddenly, I was standing in the middle of a tiny room located just beside the kitchen. It was dark and cold. The lights were turned on and I saw myself in the surrounded by numerous guns; pistols and rifles of all sizes were placed precisely on shelves and some were locked in a glass cabinet.

    I honestly got scared, and all I wanted was to run home. The father must have noticed my nervousness, tapped me on my shoulder and handed me an empty pistol, which in my hand looked more dangerous than on the shelf. I looked at him and forced a giggly smile while I handed him back the gun.

    This is because the vast majority of families have a positive connotation with firearms. You see on the news people being killed with guns and you have developed this hoplophobia against it. 99.999999% or more of Americans aren’t killing people with their firearms and they are enjoyable to them. They don’t associate their firearms with death and destruction. You do. As an example I have a beautiful swiss made k11 carbine straight pull made in 1916. All I get out of it is warm feelings. I also have a an AK variant that my father gave to me before he passed away. I remember buying it with him at the gun show when I was a kid, I remember shooting it with him for the first time. It was fun and we had a great time. Nothing horrifying about it.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:55 am
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    ■ People were happy.

    ■ Suddenly, I was standing in the middle of a tiny room located just beside the kitchen. It was dark and cold. The lights were turned on and I saw myself in the surrounded by numerous guns; pistols and rifles of all sizes were placed precisely on shelves and some were locked in a glass cabinet.

    ■ I honestly got scared, and all I wanted was to run home. The father must have noticed my nervousness, tapped me on my shoulder and handed me an empty pistol, which in my hand looked more dangerous than on the shelf. I looked at him and forced a giggly smile while I handed him back the gun.”

    └ This is because the vast majority of families have a positive connotation with firearms. You see on the news people being killed with guns and you have developed this hoplophobia against it. 99.999999% or more of Americans aren’t killing people with their firearms and they are enjoyable to them. They don’t associate their firearms with death and destruction. You do. As an example I have a beautiful swiss made k11 carbine straight pull made in 1916. All I get out of it is warm feelings. I also have a an AK variant that my father gave to me before he passed away. I remember buying it with him at the gun show when I was a kid, I remember shooting it with him for the first time. It was fun and we had a great time. Nothing horrifying about it.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 12:05 pm
    Permalink

    “People were happy.

    Suddenly, I was standing in the middle of a tiny room located just beside the kitchen. It was dark and cold. The lights were turned on and I saw myself in the surrounded by numerous guns; pistols and rifles of all sizes were placed precisely on shelves and some were locked in a glass cabinet.

    I honestly got scared, and all I wanted was to run home. The father must have noticed my nervousness, tapped me on my shoulder and handed me an empty pistol, which in my hand looked more dangerous than on the shelf. I looked at him and forced a giggly smile while I handed him back the gun.”

    –> This is because the vast majority of families have a positive connotation with firearms. You see on the news people being killed with guns and you have developed this hoplophobia against it. 99.999999% or more of Americans aren’t killing people with their firearms and they are enjoyable to them. They don’t associate their firearms with death and destruction. You do. As an example I have a beautiful swiss made k11 carbine straight pull made in 1916. All I get out of it is warm feelings. I also have a an AK variant that my father gave to me before he passed away. I remember buying it with him at the gun show when I was a kid, I remember shooting it with him for the first time. It was fun and we had a great time. Nothing horrifying about it.

    “In America, to me it seems like everybody has a gun for protection or for hunting.”

    –> Or for sport, enjoyment in shooting, and many others.

    “The American people take huge pride in their gun laws and their guns.”

    –> I take pride in our “lack” of gun laws. Which isn’t much pride at all, given how many laws we have. I wish there were fewer laws – not more.

    “In Denmark, only people with hunting certificates can buy a rifle strictly for hunting purposes only. There is extreme control, and no one can go into a pawn shop and buy a gun. It has to go carefully through the system.”

    –> We are not “pro control” here – I’m certainly not. We like freedom, self reliance, independence, personal responsibility, etc.

    “These Danish laws are held in order to decrease violence, crime, killings and other incidents involving deadly weapons.”

    –> It is against the law here to murder people. If someone is being murdered, why does it matter what instrument was employed to murder them?? Also, in another few decades, this silly anti-freedom law that makes attempts to force-fed people safety and authoritarian control, will be completely moot, when anybody and everybody will be able to print a gun made of steel by means of laser sintering. 3D plastic printers were unobtainable by the vast majority of the public due to its cost, and now anyone can have one, even build them themselves, at almost no expense at all. Laser sintering is next.

    “In Denmark, we have a strict knife law restricting the use of knives. It is illegal to carry knives in public places, and in order to have a knife blade exceed 12 centimeters, you must have permission from the police.”

    –> I’m sure the criminals completely and voluntarily follow this.

    “I am aware of the differences of society structure, government control and mentalities of Denmark and America, but I do believe guns and other deadly weapons are too easy to access in the states.”

    –> That’s fine. It is clear you don’t support the US constitution (2nd amendment of constitution –
    Question 45 of the Application of Naturalization – USCIS form N400). When you are finished up here, please make no attempts to become a US citizen and move back to Denmark. Denmark is the place for you.

    “Honestly, I believe American gun laws are extremely casual. I understand the American pride regarding guns, but I do not think anybody should be proud of the innocent people get killed every year in America, either because of street or gang violence or police violence, and I believe this is due to the mentality concerning guns.”

    –> Mentality concerning guns, or mentality concerning murder? Again, 99.99999% or more of Americans like the guns and don’t want to kill anyone. Is the problem the gun, or the individuals decision to commit murder? Do you seriously think for one second that the street and gang criminals are getting their guns legally? The problem here isn’t a gun problem. It’s a criminal problem. People willing to kill other people. They are the problem. Not people that own guns.

    “It saddens me innocent people get shot by police or innocent kids get caught in the middle of a drug war and lose their lives.”

    –> It saddens me that people don’t take responsibility for their children and just hand them over to the village to be raised by the riffraff. Again, is the problem that guns exist in this environment? Or is the problem that people were raised without morals and civility?

    “This problem cannot be solved by increasing the causality of weapons.”

    –> I disagree with your premise that the “problem” is guns. The problem is morally reprehensible individuals. When they murder someone, I am upset about the death that has resulted. I could care less what instrument they used to murder someone. The problem is they murdered someone. The problem isn’t, that they owned a gun, or a knife, or a bat, or whatever.

    “It is about time the American gun industry is called out as well as its money and power is decreased.”

    –> Uhhh. No. The “American Gun Industry” isn’t the cause of crime and gang violence. The “American Gun Industry” isn’t a single entity appropriated by taxes. It is many thousands of large and small companies privately owned and operated by people with the freedom to do so. I know you don’t like this kind of freedom, which is why Denmark is the place for you.

    –> Everything about your post is offensive by the way. If you don’t like our culture, you don’t have to stay here. Your opinion is noted, and we don’t really care for it. I wouldn’t go to Denmark and tell them that I didn’t like their culture and that they should change it because I didn’t like it. But yet this is what you are doing to us.

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 12:24 pm
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    Ms. Davidsen,

    Your fear is born, as always, in your utter ignorance. If you’d like to actually learn something about the subject, including the laws and customs in your own nation, all you have to do is ask.

    In the meantime, your support of Fascism is noted. I thought you Europeans had learned your lessons about that. It appears that I was wrong…..

    Sincerely, A Free Citizen

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  • April 29, 2017 at 1:00 pm
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    Yeah, who knew Americans loved firearms?!?! Holy cow lady! Did you never read a book, watch TV, or talk to someone? Plus, go home and solve all Denmark’s problems first. We do not need your advise.
    If you do not like it, leave and do not come back. Your country has relied on US guns since 1939 to keep your punk asses safe. Denmark’s armed services are a joke. You are welcome by the way. What a bunch of loser, left wing wimps.

    Reply
    • April 29, 2017 at 10:10 pm
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      Mark, how small is it? I hope you feel adequate soon.

      Reply
      • April 30, 2017 at 6:06 am
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        Awwww, you’re obsession with other people’s genitalia, and your psychological linkage of them to firearms, is noted. Get some counseling.

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          • May 7, 2017 at 10:59 am
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            Hitler’s speech writer was a real grammar Nazi too.

            Enlightening, also, that a grammar attack was the best comeback you had. I guess it isn’t fun when someone stands up to your childish insults.

    • April 30, 2017 at 1:38 am
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      Mark, hi. People like you honestly need to learn how to write a proper counterpoint. Simply stating that this author is a “punk ass” and a “loser, left wing wimp” (which you honestly did not write out correctly) does absolutely nothing for your point. What exactly is your point, Mark? That you disagree with a young woman from a different country. Congrats. I am a woman from this country and I disagree with you and the way you have unnecessarily left comments of hate. Yet, am I telling you to stay at home and to get off the internet? Absolutely not. I have more class and can properly fineness a conversation. Here’s the deal, bud; great America, right? Am I right? Yes, I believe so… Well since we live in “great America” we have this lovely privilege/right called the First Amendment. Ah, yes! The First Amendment: FREEDOM OF SPEECH. Lol, did you forget that Mark???? It’s the Amendment that comes before any other, including the right to keep and bare arms. So, my friend Amalie here, has the right to express her opinion. Hence, why this is an OPINION ARTICLE! Woohooooo! Stating the obvious. Because in case you were unaware, you are commenting on a university newspaper’s website where we publish student/contributor’s voices. I am incredibly sorry that you disagree with her opinion, you and everyone else who has been exceptionally rude, but tough shit. Plenty of people will disagree with you on a daily basis, however you have no need to outcast someone and call them unnecessary names. You’re not cool. It’s disrespect and furthermore I have no respect for people such as yourself, and ask that you apologize for being so rude to this author. Thanks a bunch. -Audra.

      Reply
      • April 30, 2017 at 6:10 am
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        No-one has objected to Ms. Davidsen’s freedom to proclaim any opinion she wants to hold. We do object (using OUR Freedom of Speech) to her ignorance, bigotry and illogic. Which we also have every Right to do.

        Welcome to rational adult debate.

        Note, however, that her “opinions” are related entirely free of supporting evidence or data, and thus are free to be refuted and ridiculed if they can be proven false…..

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      • April 30, 2017 at 6:11 am
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        P.S. “Rude to the author”?

        The Author was quite rude to accuse and scold entirely innocent people as enabling criminals.

        She deserves all the factual opprobrium that can be posted.

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  • April 30, 2017 at 5:29 am
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    Yes, WE in America are a FREE people. We know that CRIMINALS DO NOT FOLLOW OR OBEY LAWS. We know that NO ONE is going to protect us except ourselves. Plus shooting guns if friggin’ fun ! lol
    You have been raised to fear an object that requires a HUMAN BEING to use it in a bad way. ALL those guns in that room spent all the time there NOT KILLING ANYONE. Get it ?
    Do you have BLUNT OBJECT laws too? ‘Cause hittin’ someone upside the head with a blunt object will kill them quick as hell. Actually, one punch can knock someone out and kill them. [often they are REALLY hurt when their head smashes into the hard ground after being knocked out]
    I’m sorry Denmark and all the rest of the world don’t have the FREEDOMS we do in America. It’s sad.

    Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 11:19 am
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    “Honestly, I believe American gun laws are extremely casual. I understand the American pride regarding guns, but I do not think anybody should be proud of the innocent people get killed every year in America, either because of street or gang violence or police violence, and I believe this is due to the mentality concerning guns.”

    The author makes an excellent point here, unwittingly. It’s not the guns it’s the culture. The murder rate in America is at a 50 year low. The last time it was this low was the late 1950’s early 1960’s before most gun control laws had been passed. Those guns she spotted at Walmart weren’t behind glass cabinets when I was growing up, they were on racks in the local Sears where you could handle them. You could buy guns and ammo at the local hardware store downtown. You could have a rifle mailed to your house. No background check, no nothing.

    It’s not the guns, it’s the culture. Specifically the inner-city gang culture where the majority of most murders take place. These are not bastions of “gun culture.” The welfare system in America is to blame for a lot of the trouble. By granting incentives to young women to have children out of wedlock, the family structure in these communities has collapsed and you, fatherless men run wild, leading to both gang shootings and police shootings.

    This dynamic, foreseen by Democrat Daniel Patrick Moynahan all the way back in the 1960s, has helped to fuel the murder rate in these communities. Sanctuary cities and an influx of violent illegal immigrants (MS-13 in Long Island, as an example) hasn’t helped.

    So no, it’s no the guns. It’s the imposition of ill thought out social policy in the US which has led to the tragedy which is Baltimore, New Orleans and Chicago.

    Reply

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